Fishing in Cyprus, a blog post test

Fishing in Cyprus, a blog post test

When you think of how most fish, lobster and other shellfish end up on plates around the world, what likely comes to mind is large scale industrial trawling, raking in catches by the tonnes.

The truth is, about 35% of the world's fish comes from artisanal fishermen in small sailboats, motorboats, or canoes - and although a lot of their catch is sold locally - a lot of it too, sustains the planet’s commercial seafood markets.

Blue Economy is an umbrella term for economic activities related to the seas, where marine resources provide food and livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people worldwide, many of whom live in vulnerable coastal communities.

According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, almost 80% of the world's fish stocks are now fully exploited, overexploited or depleted. Climate change, overfishing, increased pollution and the destruction of ecosystems seriously threaten the sector, causing major social and economic consequences across the globe, particularly in nations highly dependent on their waters.

One such nation, is Honduras.

When you think of how most fish, lobster and other shellfish end up on plates around the world, what likely comes to mind is large scale industrial trawling, raking in catches by the tonnes.

The truth is, about 35% of the world's fish comes from artisanal fishermen in small sailboats, motorboats, or canoes - and although a lot of their catch is sold locally - a lot of it too, sustains the planet’s commercial seafood markets.

Blue Economy is an umbrella term for economic activities related to the seas, where marine resources provide food and livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people worldwide, many of whom live in vulnerable coastal communities.

According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, almost 80% of the world's fish stocks are now fully exploited, overexploited or depleted. Climate change, overfishing, increased pollution and the destruction of ecosystems seriously threaten the sector, causing major social and economic consequences across the globe, particularly in nations highly dependent on their waters.

One such nation, is Honduras.

When you think of how most fish, lobster and other shellfish end up on plates around the world, what likely comes to mind is large scale industrial trawling, raking in catches by the tonnes.

The truth is, about 35% of the world's fish comes from artisanal fishermen in small sailboats, motorboats, or canoes - and although a lot of their catch is sold locally - a lot of it too, sustains the planet’s commercial seafood markets.

Blue Economy is an umbrella term for economic activities related to the seas, where marine resources provide food and livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people worldwide, many of whom live in vulnerable coastal communities.

According to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, almost 80% of the world's fish stocks are now fully exploited, overexploited or depleted. Climate change, overfishing, increased pollution and the destruction of ecosystems seriously threaten the sector, causing major social and economic consequences across the globe, particularly in nations highly dependent on their waters.

One such nation, is Honduras.

Michael Marangos